Britain By Car - A Motoring History

Bloomfield and Anderton Road

The family homes of Jensen Motors founders’, Dick and Alan Jensen, where they developed and built their first cars.

Location
Bloomfield Road and 95 Anderton Road, Moseley, Birmingham.

Date 
1906 – c1935 

Other locations 
West Bromwich, Staffordshire

Commentary
Alan and Dick Jensen were born in 1906 and 1909 respectively; their father was the son of Danish immigrants to Britain who were involved in the business of shipbroking.

For many years the family home was in Bloomfield Road, Moseley, and it was here, in 1928, where the brothers built their first car, based on an Austin Seven Chummy, which had been a present to them from their parents. 

At the time, both were working in the motor trade; Dick was serving an apprenticeship at Wolseley Motors and Alan at Serck Radiators.  However, their interest in cars extended well beyond the factory gates, and the Special that they produced from the Chummy was built by hand in Bloomfield Road.  As David Scott-Moncrieff points out,  “it had the indefinable quality that every Jensen car has had ever since – a sense of line.”

The new car was quickly sold, and the funds used to develop the next project – using a primrose-coloured, Austin Seven-based saloon.  It was around this time that the family moved round the corner to Anderton Park Road, and this second car  was purchased by the original buyer of the first Special, who was apparently so impressed that he swapped his original Jensen back for the saloon!

Further work on the Special led to the brothers being stopped one day by Arthur Wilde, Chief Engineer of the Standard Motor Company, who asked if they would be prepared to design a sports car for one of his own Standard chassis.

The brothers agreed, and the prototype that they produced went to the Avon Coachworks where it went into production as the Avon Standard.

In 1931, the Jensen brothers began work for J A Patrick, owner of Edgbaston Garage in nearby Selly Oak, Birmingham.

Further details 
• Jensen & Jensen-Healey, Keith Anderson, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 1998.
• The Thoroughbred Motor Car 1930-1940, David Scott-Moncrieff, Batsford, 1963.